Sunday, February 13, 2011

NED in Tunisia and Yemen



Is there a surprise that the youth was behind the Tunisian Revolution?

NED in Tunisia

Al-Jahedh Forum for Free Thought (AJFFT)
$131,000
To strengthen the capacity and build a democratic culture among Tunisian youth activists. AJFFT will hold discussion forums on contemporary issues related to Islam and democracy, debates between Arab scholars on societal problem, academic lectures on Islam, economic policy and international relations, and book review sessions. AJFFT will conduct leadership training workshops, support local youth cultural projects, expand its library, and produce and publish two annual research books. AJFFT will conclude the program by convening its National Congress.

Association for the Promotion of Education (APES)
$27,000
To strengthen the capacity of Tunisian high school teachers to promote democratic and civic values in their classrooms. APES will conduct a training-of-trainers workshop for 10 university professors and school inspectors, and hold three two-day capacity building seminars for 120 high school teachers on pedagogical approaches rooted in democratic and civic values. Through this project, APES seeks to incorporate the values of tolerance, relativism and pluralism in Tunisia’s secondary educational system.

Mohamed Ali Center for Research, Studies and Training (CEMAREF)
$33,500
To train a core group of Tunisian youth activists on leadership and organizational skills to encourage their involvement in public life. CEMAREF will conduct a four-day intensive training of trainers program for a core group of 10 young Tunisian civic activists on leadership and organizational skills; train 50 male and female activists aged 20 to 40 on leadership and empowered decision-making; and work with the trained activists through 50 on-site visits to their respective organizations.


NED in Yemen


Yemen sunk deeper into insecurity and instability, with increased Al-Qaeda violence in the east, Houthis’ rebellion in the north, and a separatist movement in the south. These challenges gave the government an excuse to turn its back on reforms, limit freedom of expression and quash dissent. In response, the Endowment expanded its support to groups defending freedom of expression and human rights. NED supported the Altagheer.net news website, one of the few independent media outlets in the country, as well as Women Journalists Without Chains, which campaigned relentlessly for press freedom, human rights and political reform in Yemen.

Altagheer.Net
$32,700
To facilitate the free flow of independent news information to Yemenis on issues related to social, political, and economic growth of the country and to build the capacity of journalists to effectively monitor and report on human rights issues. Altagheer will continue to improve its Arabic daily news website. Altagheer will conduct capacity building workshops and a seminar for print and online journalists. Altagheer will also conduct a workshop for internet café owners.

Aswan Center for Research and Study
$25,000
To identify the political needs and concerns of women, and to push political parties to adopt women’s issues in their party platforms. The center will conduct focus groups to gather women’s opinions, and how their needs could be fulfilled. It will also conduct a survey of women. Aswan will publish a study and a book on the findings, including recommendations. It will hold a conference and advocate political parties to give women’s issues a central place in their party agendas.

Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE)
$184,436
To facilitate access to information and analysis about economic reform. CIPE and MWF will produce thirty 20-30 minute radio programs on economic reform in Yemen and sponsor economic reform pages in two independent newspapers. These programs will cover issues such as economic reform, transparency, and corruption, and empower Yemenis to participate in the democratic and economic reform process and to hold the government accountable for it.

Civic Democratic Initiatives Support Foundation (CDF)
$58,000
To strengthen women’s political participation in 50 rural Yemeni districts, the Civic Democratic Initiative Support Foundation will conduct one national level training-of-trainers workshop, seven provincial level workshops and 50 district level workshops on leadership skills, communication, advocacy and decision-making. In preparation for the 2011 local elections, CDF will also conduct a campaign training program for women in the project’s targeted districts.

Civil Development Foundation
$29,000
To encourage Yemeni youth to participate in the political process. Civil Development Foundation will conduct a yearlong program to empower 50 youth leaders to run an initiative to encourage youth participation in political parties. After intensive training, the youth will conduct an awareness campaign, hold seminars for other youth, and volunteer in youth organizations around the country.

Madar Legal Foundation
$24,000To build the capacity of a cadre of women lawyer activists to defend and promote women’s rights, Madar will conduct a series of six workshops in four provinces that cover the fundamentals of court procedure, communication skills, international law application, legal writing and litigation. Madar will also continue their pro-bono legal assistance program for women.

National Forum for Human Rights (NFHR)
$30,000To build the capacities of civil society organizations, local council members and educators to conduct human rights awareness campaigns. The NFHR will strengthen human rights education in provinces outside Yemen’s capital. NFHR will conduct a training-of-trainers workshop for ten of last year’s graduates who will then conduct five, three-day training workshops in the five targeted provinces. The project will culminate in a month-long human rights awareness campaign to be conducted by graduates of the provincial trainings.

National Organization for Developing Society
$37,000
To provide local imams and women religious teachers in five governorates with transferable skills in democracy, human rights and communications skills. NODS will conduct advanced training for 20 previously trained imams and murshidaat on democracy and human rights, and interpretive methodologies for their application within an Islamic framework, who will then train 150 of their counterparts in five additional southern Yemeni governorates.

Tamkeen Foundation
$25,000To raise youth awareness of democratic principles and improve youth access to democratic ideas. Tamkeen will conduct a yearlong educational program to promote youth awareness of democratic principles in Lahij and Mahweet. In each province, Tamkeen will run a competition on human rights principles for 16 schools, and exhibit three short films that illustrate the practical application of human rights principles in the Yemeni political framework.

Women Journalists Without Chains
$50,000
To raise awareness regarding participation in elections, processes of parliament and local government and the role of political parties, to train media students, and to develop their commitment to using media to promote good governance. Women Journalists without Chains will engage media students in producing programs on governance issues. The project will educate the public and develop the media students’ technical skills and commitment to using the media to strengthen democracy.

Yemen Foundation for Social Studies (YFSS)
$25,000
To build the capacities of organizations in rural areas to conduct women’s empowerment activities and to raise awareness about the lack of women’s activities. YFSS will conduct a survey of community organizations to determine obstacles facing women participation. YFSS will compile the survey results and distribute copies to local civil society and media organizations. YFSS will then conduct a training program for leaders of local NGOs to address their needs and expand their program to include women empowerment.

Yemeni Observatory for Human Rights (YOHR)
$40,000
To monitor, document and report publically on human rights conditions in Yemen and to enhance cooperation between Yemeni media outlets and civil society in promoting and protecting human rights. YOHR will conduct a year-long monitoring program and compile and publish its fifth annual human rights report; hold a media strategy session to promote human rights; and provide legal aid to victims of human rights violations.

Youth Leadership Development Foundation
$46,400
To empower youth throughout Yemen to conduct human rights advocacy. Youth Leadership Development Foundation will conduct an intensive three week human rights training program for youth from all of Yemen’s governorates. After the program, the youth will develop and implement human rights activities in their own governorates, and will form a national Youth for Human Rights forum.

Al-Amal Association
$25,000
To promote civic and human rights awareness amongst Akhdam communities, and to raise awareness of the marginalized status of the Akhdam. Al-Amal Association for Development of Marginalized Groups will conduct a multi-component project to improve the status of Yemen’s Akhdam communities. Led by a group of Akhdam activists, the project includes legal awareness and assistance, advocacy, networking and coalition building to empower this population.

The grant listings posted here are from the 2009 Annual Report, published in June 2010.

Source: NED

2 comments:

I understand and wish to continue said...

Hi HBM,
bloody hell, no wonder the whole region is a pack of falling dominos at the moment.
NED are everywhere.
I thank you for showing us this, and i've given you a heads up on my blog as i've just posted on Algeria and Yemen.
http://thirteenthmonkey.blogspot.com/2011/02/neds-balls-in-air.html
Thanks again.
Cheers A13

Honk Bonk Man said...

Hmmm, the YouTube videos related to Philip Agee is no long available. I think I can get these videos from some other account. The YouTube says the following about TheFilmArchive account that was terminated:

thefilmarchive has been terminated due to multiple or severe violations of our Community Guidelines.

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